October 19, 2014

H/t Crew House for blasting this last night.

(Source: youtube.com)

12:47pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zlk2ut1TXTBYy
Filed under: music 
October 16, 2014

(Source: pinterest.com, via thetieguy)

4:12pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zlk2ut1TJI2E7
  
Filed under: menswear 
October 16, 2014
voxsart:

Fell Deeds Thursday.
Featuring the long front dart.

voxsart:

Fell Deeds Thursday.

Featuring the long front dart.

October 15, 2014

(Source: pinterest.com, via thetieguy)

October 15, 2014

(Source: pinterest.com, via thetieguy)

October 15, 2014
Drake’s Iconic Four Ply Cashmere Shawl Collar Cardigan - Charcoal Grey

Drake’s Iconic Four Ply Cashmere Shawl Collar Cardigan - Charcoal Grey

2:55pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zlk2ut1TE4weI
Filed under: want 
October 15, 2014
Gucci - 1953 horsebit loafer in leather

Gucci - 1953 horsebit loafer in leather

2:26pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zlk2ut1TDzMlJ
Filed under: want 
October 15, 2014
fromsqualortoballer:

Item Roundup: Chukka Boots
The leaves are starting to change colors (or so I’m told), everyone’s talking about pumpkin spice lattes, and the dollar is gaining ground on the euro. When put together, these signs can only mean one thing - it’s time to grab some autumnal footwear.
The chukka boot is an incredibly versatile shoe and is perfectly at home in the autumnal months. I have two pairs and find myself reaching for them more than any other style. They make a great in-between shoe and I highly suggest that you try out a pair if you haven’t already.
Read More

fromsqualortoballer:

Item Roundup: Chukka Boots

The leaves are starting to change colors (or so I’m told), everyone’s talking about pumpkin spice lattes, and the dollar is gaining ground on the euro. When put together, these signs can only mean one thing - it’s time to grab some autumnal footwear.

The chukka boot is an incredibly versatile shoe and is perfectly at home in the autumnal months. I have two pairs and find myself reaching for them more than any other style. They make a great in-between shoe and I highly suggest that you try out a pair if you haven’t already.

Read More

2:18pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zlk2ut1TDxUXP
  
Filed under: advice 
October 15, 2014
fromsqualortoballer:

The In-Between Wardrobe, Part II: Shoes
The “In-Between Wardrobe” is a series of articles aimed at helping men find items that will play a versatile role in their closet. It is written with the idea that most men don’t wear extremely formal or casual clothing on a regular basis; they usually need items that are somewhere in the middle. See all articles in the series here.
Shoes are a critical element of in-between dressing, and are one area that is constantly being messed up by men that don’t know any better. The core idea behind finding an in-between shoe is balancing casual and formal features to achieve something that can be worn with a large variety of clothes. 
First, it is important to understand what makes a shoe a “good” shoe and how to look for high-quality materials and construction in footwear. If you’re not familiar with these concepts, read my previous post on that topic. Once you’re on board with that, join in below.
Read More

fromsqualortoballer:

The In-Between Wardrobe, Part II: Shoes

The “In-Between Wardrobe” is a series of articles aimed at helping men find items that will play a versatile role in their closet. It is written with the idea that most men don’t wear extremely formal or casual clothing on a regular basis; they usually need items that are somewhere in the middle. See all articles in the series here.

Shoes are a critical element of in-between dressing, and are one area that is constantly being messed up by men that don’t know any better. The core idea behind finding an in-between shoe is balancing casual and formal features to achieve something that can be worn with a large variety of clothes. 

First, it is important to understand what makes a shoe a “good” shoe and how to look for high-quality materials and construction in footwear. If you’re not familiar with these concepts, read my previous post on that topic. Once you’re on board with that, join in below.

Read More

October 14, 2014
Ulysses

Tho’ much is taken, much abides; and though
We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven; that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

7:09pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zlk2ut1TAHKl0
Filed under: text quotes 
October 14, 2014

nonsumqualise said: You have fabulous taste, so I'd like to pose an inquiry for a (female) friend of mine: winter boots/shoes options for women, aside from Hunter boots?

perles-chics:

1. Booties are really popular this winter! Suede or a tan/neutral leather with a heel. I prefer the chunkier wooden heel since you can dress it up or down.

2. There’s also leather riding boots. For a different style instead of the ones that hit right below the knee, perhaps try a new length like the mid calf.

3. When the weather gets nasty, I think LL Bean duck boots are much cuter than the Sorel brands. You can also get duck boots with insulate for more warmth in the snow. 

4. For more casual and every day, maybe flats in a dark color like grey. I honestly think flats can be worn all year long. So you can try a red, burgundy, or leopard print for a pop of color against all the dark colors of winter. 

5. Moon boots. I’m just kidding. Seriously. Don’t. :)

October 14, 2014

When food is gone, you are my daily meal.

3:14pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zlk2ut1T9DtVk
Filed under: music 
October 13, 2014
So sprezzie.

So sprezzie.

(Source: bstmr78, via perles-chics)

October 13, 2014
putthison:

Fixing Snags
Fall is the season for sweaters and … snagging sweaters. If you end up getting a snag, there’s a good and bad way to fix it. 
The bad way is cutting it, which you absolutely don’t want to do. You might think that you’re getting rid of the pull, but over time, this area can develop a hole. 
A better solution is to pull the snag to the backside of the garment, so that the thread is still intact, but the damage is invisible. There are several ways to do this:
You can use a tool called a Snag Nab-It, which is basically a long needle with a rough end. Push it through your snag and the rough end will take it to the other side. I’ve used this successfully on knits and wovens (wovens meaning the non-stretchy material you find on dress shirts and trousers), but if your material is particularly fine or delicate, you might want to try another method. 
A gentler solution is to use a large sewing needle with a big eye. Couple this with a needle threader or some kind of thread, and use both to “catch” the snag as you pull the needle through. You can also use some thick embroidery or button thread, which you can wrap your snag on, and do the same thing. Remember, for something really delicate, go slow. It’s better to work this area a few times, rather than worsen the damage. 
For the truly patient, you can use also a large blunt needle and try to tease the yarn back to its original place. Pull the thread through to the next stitch, and then the next, and then the next — dispersing the excess material evenly across the row. You want to work both sides of the snag, so that everything looks natural. This easier on large gauge knits, but it’s possible with fine ones as well. Once your done, steam the area and admire your work. 

putthison:

Fixing Snags

Fall is the season for sweaters and … snagging sweaters. If you end up getting a snag, there’s a good and bad way to fix it. 

The bad way is cutting it, which you absolutely don’t want to do. You might think that you’re getting rid of the pull, but over time, this area can develop a hole. 

A better solution is to pull the snag to the backside of the garment, so that the thread is still intact, but the damage is invisible. There are several ways to do this:

  • You can use a tool called a Snag Nab-It, which is basically a long needle with a rough end. Push it through your snag and the rough end will take it to the other side. I’ve used this successfully on knits and wovens (wovens meaning the non-stretchy material you find on dress shirts and trousers), but if your material is particularly fine or delicate, you might want to try another method. 
  • A gentler solution is to use a large sewing needle with a big eye. Couple this with a needle threader or some kind of thread, and use both to “catch” the snag as you pull the needle through. You can also use some thick embroidery or button thread, which you can wrap your snag on, and do the same thing. Remember, for something really delicate, go slow. It’s better to work this area a few times, rather than worsen the damage. 

For the truly patient, you can use also a large blunt needle and try to tease the yarn back to its original place. Pull the thread through to the next stitch, and then the next, and then the next — dispersing the excess material evenly across the row. You want to work both sides of the snag, so that everything looks natural. This easier on large gauge knits, but it’s possible with fine ones as well. Once your done, steam the area and admire your work. 

October 11, 2014

meccariello-calzoleria:

Aurum: Model Romulus. An Adelaide model with a particular heel counter.

This shoe was made on one of my very old lasts called “Mayfair”. It is made with hand coloured crust leather.

(via torontoman)

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